Hinge cut bedding area for whitetail deer

This video shows the cutting of over 100 trees by one man in 2 hours on a south facing hillside. This area is currently used for deer bedding, including doe beds and buck beds, but so is the other side of the hill. I want to discourage bedding on the other side because deer can observe my approach to my deer stand from there. To do so, I optimize bedding on the south side of the hill, and destroy bedding on the north side (see earlier blog post “I destroy a buck bed!”). I used a habitat hook that could be extended to 16 feet. Without it, I would not have been able to do so much habitat work or keep so many hinge cut trees from breaking. With the leverage from the habitat hook I was able to stop cutting sooner, so the tree would not lean back to pinch my saw or fall forward on its own with the possibility of breaking off, and push or pull trees down gently. Extendable habitat Hooks are available from www.nationscreations.net I receive no compensation for any product I recommend, but do the recommendations only because I want to get the best tools in people’s hands.

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  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge cut bedding area for whitetail deer
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge cut bedding area for whitetail deer
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge cut bedding area for whitetail deer
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge cut bedding area for whitetail deer
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge cut bedding area for whitetail deer
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge cut bedding area for whitetail deer
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge cut bedding area for whitetail deer
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12 comments on “Hinge cut bedding area for whitetail deer
  1. Mike says:

    Great vids!! how much will your book cost?

    • Dr Jim says:

      Thanks Mike. Price has not been set yet. If you sign in on the sidebar you will receive an email when the price is set announcing how to purchase.

  2. Mike says:

    Im signed in and watched all of your videos, Im already getting fired up about this book. How many pages is it?

    • Dr Jim says:

      Mike I am still laying out some chapters so don’t have the number of pages. It will be initially released as an electronic book with huge numbers of pictures and illustrations as well as links to videos. Thanks for your interest. You will hear from me as we get closer to release.

  3. Mike says:

    Great, looking forward to the paper book, we tried some “test hinge cuts” and had some really nice results. Now we want to take it to the next level.

  4. Ron Ruscitti says:

    Please let me know when book is available for purchase.

    • Dr Jim says:

      It will be available at the end of this month. If you have signed in on the website you will receive notice about how to buy it.

      • Ron Ruscitti says:

        I’ve got an 18 acre farm that was mostly clear cut before we bought it in 2010. Tree tops are still decomposing and very thick with briars and saplings. It has become a deer bedroom making it very hard to hunt due to the deer leaving as soon as walk thru farm. It has been very frustrating although see lots of deer, any suggestions?

        • Dr Jim says:

          Hi Ron. Yes, I am very interested in micro property design and there will be a chapter dedicated to it in the book. If your entire property was clearcut, it is an example of too much of a good thing. I would plan on dedicating about 5 acres as the easily accessible end of the property to micro food plots surrounded by heavy cover. The transition zone I describe in my first chapter is what I would try to produce. Go in and create several 0.05-0.15 acre plots with a transition area between them and the bedding and then hunt between the bedding and food. Transition areas need to have cover but be less desirable for bedding than the defined bedding area.

  5. Steve Durand says:

    looking for name of book and how to purchase

  6. In the several years following this pine thinning the briars and honeysuckle and other native plants thrived in the sun-drenched section, creating an awesome bedding area for deer.

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