Hinge Cut Edge Feathered Woods: 7 minutes, 25 trees (1.75 minute video).

One of the easiest ways to create cover on a woods edge is to simply fell trees along the edge by hinge cutting. Trees on a woods edge will usually be leaning out to get sun, so it is easy and simple to just cut the trees with their lean and let them fall over. In this video I cut 25 trees in 7 minutes (video length less than two minutes).

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  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge Cut Edge Feathered Woods: 7 minutes, 25 trees (1.75 minute video).
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge Cut Edge Feathered Woods: 7 minutes, 25 trees (1.75 minute video).
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge Cut Edge Feathered Woods: 7 minutes, 25 trees (1.75 minute video).
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge Cut Edge Feathered Woods: 7 minutes, 25 trees (1.75 minute video).
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge Cut Edge Feathered Woods: 7 minutes, 25 trees (1.75 minute video).
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge Cut Edge Feathered Woods: 7 minutes, 25 trees (1.75 minute video).
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge Cut Edge Feathered Woods: 7 minutes, 25 trees (1.75 minute video).
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Extreme Deer Habitat Book Release

Release date is February 14th. The book will available from Feb 14th to Feb 28th at A 15% discount to anyone who is registered on my website (sidebar on right). After that it will go to the regular price OF 19.99

This will be an ebook available in either a pdf or epub format.

Links to free readers will be available at the purchase location for both desktop and mobile devices.

The book is over 200 pages with one to several color pictures, diagrams, or sidebars on every single page.

It would be prohibitively expensive to print in its current form, and doing so would greatly diminish the value.

The book will have clickable links to videos, articles, and websites that support the information.

For example, if I talk about a chainsaw technique, you will be able to look at the pictures of how it is done, but in many cases you will also be able to click to a video showing how it is done.

Cover 791x1024 Extreme Deer Habitat Book Release

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  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Extreme Deer Habitat Book Release
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Extreme Deer Habitat Book Release
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Extreme Deer Habitat Book Release
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Extreme Deer Habitat Book Release
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Extreme Deer Habitat Book Release
Posted in Uncategorized

Building a Buck Bed in a Swamp

In this video Jake Ehlinger from Habitat Solutions and I demonstrate how to make a hinge cut bedding spot for a buck in just a few minutes. Step one is to identify a spot. In this case it is a raised spot in the swamp that will stay high and dry year around, and has a view of a hinge cut bedding spot for does we made earlier. Next, we hinge cut larger trees next to the mound, and then hinge cut or pulled smaller trees down and tied them off with parachute cord. This creates overhead cover and lateral horizontal cover to make the buck feel more secure. We make several of these buck bedding spots for each doe bedding spot so that a buck will use the area under any wind or weather conditions.

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  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Building a Buck Bed in a Swamp
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Building a Buck Bed in a Swamp
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Building a Buck Bed in a Swamp
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Building a Buck Bed in a Swamp
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Building a Buck Bed in a Swamp
Posted in Uncategorized

Self-Video: 3 Friends, 3 Trophy Bucks, 3 Small Properties: All on the Same Day

I was privileged to kill a big 8 point buck on my 40 acre Michigan property on November 2, 2014, and I got the whole thing on video (see below). Not only that, but my two good friends and best deer habitat mentors also killed trophy bucks on their small properties on the same day. Mike Hartges got a gorgeous 8 point and Jake Ehlinger got a 225 lb. 10 point. Mike’s property is 59 acres, Jake’s is 67 acres, and mine is 40 acres. How can such massive deer be killed on such small properties? A major component is that all three properties have extremely well managed habitat with a variety of food and cover. The cover is so dense on these three small properties that each property can provide bedding for several mature bucks at the same time. If you would like to improve the habitat on your small property so that you can harvest bucks like these, buy my book when it comes out in January, 2015. To read a free chapter and get a discount when the book comes out sign in on the sidebar of this page.

mike jim jake sized 795x1024 Self Video: 3 Friends, 3 Trophy Bucks, 3 Small Properties: All on the Same Day

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  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Self Video: 3 Friends, 3 Trophy Bucks, 3 Small Properties: All on the Same Day
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Self Video: 3 Friends, 3 Trophy Bucks, 3 Small Properties: All on the Same Day
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Self Video: 3 Friends, 3 Trophy Bucks, 3 Small Properties: All on the Same Day
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Self Video: 3 Friends, 3 Trophy Bucks, 3 Small Properties: All on the Same Day
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Self Video: 3 Friends, 3 Trophy Bucks, 3 Small Properties: All on the Same Day
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Self Video: 3 Friends, 3 Trophy Bucks, 3 Small Properties: All on the Same Day
Posted in Uncategorized

Don’t blame the corn

Every year at this time I begin to hear hunters starting to complain about having standing corn in their area. If your deer are hiding in standing corn all day, don’t blame the corn. Deer are creatures that crave variety. They do not want to be stuck all day in a location with only one kind of plant and one food source. Dear hiding in standing corn all day is a wake up[ call to improve your hunting techniques and habitat. Watch this video to learn more about how to improve your property so that deer freely move around in daylight, even during firearms seasons.

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  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px  Dont blame the corn
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px  Dont blame the corn
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px  Dont blame the corn
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px  Dont blame the corn
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px  Dont blame the corn
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Whitetail Myth: Bucks Chasing Does is a Rut Indicator–Not!

Every year like clockwork I begin to see posts on forums and Facebook about the rut being “on” because someone saw a buck chasing does. In most cases, especially in early october in Michigan, chasing has little to do with whether does are in estrus or not. It is just young boys being young boys. Juvenile antlered bucks begin chasing they day they shed their velvet. They are not chasing because the rut is on or there is a doe in estrus. They will chase any and every antlerless deer they come into contact with when they are not too discouraged by rejection or too tired.

This video shows typical young buck behavior Behind the Barn in my 8 acre research habitat on October 12th 2013. None of these deer are receptive to this buck and he does not discriminated on who he chases. he is chasing deer for the same reason the adolescents in the movie Porky’s peak through the keyhole of the door to the girl’s gym.

In either case, it has nothing whatsoever to do with breeding.

If you see a buck of 3.5 or older chasing a doe, well you can guess that she just may be ready to breed. Based on scientific studies, we know that the whitetail rut occurs in any given area roughly the same time every year. It may be over a three month window in the south, or a five week window in the north, and it may be affected by things like weather and hunting pressure, but it happens the same time every year. So plan your hunts around the times when mature bucks are most likely to be moving. In my home state of Michigan, that is around the first two weeks of November. After that hunting pressure changes daytime movement in many areas, but does not slow down the breeding process.

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  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Whitetail Myth: Bucks Chasing Does is a Rut Indicator  Not!
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Whitetail Myth: Bucks Chasing Does is a Rut Indicator  Not!
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Whitetail Myth: Bucks Chasing Does is a Rut Indicator  Not!
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Whitetail Myth: Bucks Chasing Does is a Rut Indicator  Not!
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Whitetail Myth: Bucks Chasing Does is a Rut Indicator  Not!
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Whitetail Myth: Bucks Chasing Does is a Rut Indicator  Not!
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Deer React to a new Mineral Site: Behind the Barn

Three days until the Michigan bow season last night and I saw lots of deer activity behind the barn. I have a new box-blind at the back edge of my yard. It sits on a berm looking down on food plots and cover not visible from the house. Yesterday I set up a mineral station there and it was fun to watch the reaction of the deer to it that evening.

The night before I had just put the roll roofing on and was working on the inside when the deer started to show up. A couple of nice bucks showed up towards dark and one of them shook one of my basswood saplings pretty hard.

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  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Deer React to a new Mineral Site: Behind the Barn
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Deer React to a new Mineral Site: Behind the Barn
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Deer React to a new Mineral Site: Behind the Barn
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Deer React to a new Mineral Site: Behind the Barn
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Deer React to a new Mineral Site: Behind the Barn
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Deer React to a new Mineral Site: Behind the Barn
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Hinge Cutting Mistake: Why you should never cut at a downward angle when hinge cutting trees for deer habitat

Many tree fellers ignore the instructions in their chainsaw manual, choosing to make a back cut with a downward angle when conventionally felling trees and when hinge cutting for whitetail deer habitat. This is a dangerous practice that takes a lot of extra work and results in a weaker hinge, a higher likelihood that the tree will break off, and a higher probability that the tree will fall backwards.

Please greatly improve your safety and efficacy in the woods by watching this short video that clearly shows how much extra work you do while doing an angled cut, and the return for all that extra work is that you end up with a more unstable tree that is less likely to survive and much more likely to fall over backwards.

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  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge Cutting Mistake: Why you should never cut at a downward angle when hinge cutting trees for deer habitat
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge Cutting Mistake: Why you should never cut at a downward angle when hinge cutting trees for deer habitat
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge Cutting Mistake: Why you should never cut at a downward angle when hinge cutting trees for deer habitat
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge Cutting Mistake: Why you should never cut at a downward angle when hinge cutting trees for deer habitat
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge Cutting Mistake: Why you should never cut at a downward angle when hinge cutting trees for deer habitat
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge Cutting Mistake: Why you should never cut at a downward angle when hinge cutting trees for deer habitat
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge Cutting Mistake: Why you should never cut at a downward angle when hinge cutting trees for deer habitat
Posted in Uncategorized

Hinge cut bedding area for whitetail deer

This video shows the cutting of over 100 trees by one man in 2 hours on a south facing hillside. This area is currently used for deer bedding, including doe beds and buck beds, but so is the other side of the hill. I want to discourage bedding on the other side because deer can observe my approach to my deer stand from there. To do so, I optimize bedding on the south side of the hill, and destroy bedding on the north side (see earlier blog post “I destroy a buck bed!”). I used a habitat hook that could be extended to 16 feet. Without it, I would not have been able to do so much habitat work or keep so many hinge cut trees from breaking. With the leverage from the habitat hook I was able to stop cutting sooner, so the tree would not lean back to pinch my saw or fall forward on its own with the possibility of breaking off, and push or pull trees down gently. Extendable habitat Hooks are available from www.nationscreations.net I receive no compensation for any product I recommend, but do the recommendations only because I want to get the best tools in people’s hands.

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  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge cut bedding area for whitetail deer
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge cut bedding area for whitetail deer
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge cut bedding area for whitetail deer
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge cut bedding area for whitetail deer
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Hinge cut bedding area for whitetail deer
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How to never have a serious poison ivy rash again!

Holding Poison Ivy
Poison Ivy 150x150 How to never have a serious poison ivy rash again!

Scientist and wildlife habitat enthusiast Jim Brauker holding a poison ivy leaf.

I am very allergic to poison ivy yet am no longer afraid to touch it because I understand how to avoid getting a rash.

When I retired as a research scientist I had been involved in studies of wound healing, immunology, and  inflammation of the skin for over 25 years. After retiring I started spending much of my time in the woods doing work on deer habitat. I had several serious bouts with poison ivy before I decided I was either going to figure things out or quit working in the woods.  I figured it out. I know now how poison ivy works, and so I doubt I will ever have a serious rash again. If I do, it will be my fault not the fault of the poison ivy. Watch this video and I believe that you will be convinced that you do not have to fear poison ivy.  How it infects you is actually no mysterious at all but is really quite simple.  You can act to never have a serious poison ivy rash again.

My upcoming book, “Extreme Deer Habitat” will have an entire chapter with lots of other tips about how to prevent and treat poison ivy, oak, and sumac reactions.

Click HERE for more videos and articles on Deer Habitat and Hinge Cutting

 

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  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px How to never have a serious poison ivy rash again!
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px How to never have a serious poison ivy rash again!
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px How to never have a serious poison ivy rash again!
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px How to never have a serious poison ivy rash again!
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px How to never have a serious poison ivy rash again!
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Posted in gardening, toxic plants, Uncategorized, wildlife habitat

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